Kids Healthworks
behavior
development
family matters
first aid
fitness
health
infants
infections
nutrition
show categories

Looking for a show topic?

search
 

Google




ITV American Academy of Pediatrics Discovery Health Channel

TV Show Excerpt - Choking Prevention and First Aid

The following excerpt is from the original transcript of the Kids Healthworks television series, episode 106.

WENDY RUTLEDGE (HOST)
It's a proud day when your baby learns to crawl. But with that excitement comes caution. Objects you hadn't thought twice about may become choking hazards for the inquisitive child. In fact, choking is the most common cause of injury-related death in children under one year of age.

D. MULLIGAN-SMITH, MD, FAAP
NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

Their anatomy is such that they have a smaller airway that can be easily plugged by common items in the house, like marbles, balls, coins, balloons.

HOST
Toys may also present a problem. The Child Safety Protection Act passed in 1995 requires manufacturers to put labels on all toys that might present a choking hazard to children three years old or younger, so look for the label. What else can a parent do to avoid choking hazards?

D. MULLIGAN-SMITH, MD, FAAP
We're pretty tall in comparison and they might be looking at a part of our world in the home that we don't typically see, so it's a good idea to get down on your knees at their eye level and look around. What are they looking at? What could they get into?

HOST
Of course, even if you are able to keep small objects out of your child's reach, food itself can present a danger. Children generally don't learn how to grind their food between their teeth until about age four, so they may attempt to swallow bites whole. Richard Burgos found that out when he realized his son Mathew - nine months old at the time - was choking on a teething biscuit.

RICHARD BURGOS
(FATHER)

Well, he had managed to gnaw off or chew off a pretty sized chunk and he tried to swallow it and it wouldn't go down. My wife was sitting at the table, I wasn't at the table at the time - the kitchen table. She stood up, started freaking out, ohmigod, ohmigod, I think he's choking! I think he's choking!

HOST
Luckily for Mathew, his father is an Emergency Medical Technician trained in first aid for choking and CPR.

RICHARD BURGOS
And I don't know, I just reacted. I really wasn't thinking that oh my God, he's going to you know, pass away or anything, but, it just happened very quick. It's after, it's after the fact that you start thinking, oh my God, you know, this could have been serious.

HOST
The American Academy of Pediatrics has compiled a list of foods that are far more likely to choke a child than teething biscuits are. These include: nuts and seeds, grapes, popcorn, raisins, chunks of meat or cheese, raw vegetables like carrots and celery, chewing gum, hard, gooey or sticky candy, hot dogs and even chunks of peanut butter.

The AAP recommends children under four avoid these foods all together. But for older children ...

D. MULLIGAN-SMITH, MD, FAAP
All that we ask is that you take a moment to consider how best to serve them to the child.

HOST
That means cutting foods like hot dogs into bite-size pieces and then cutting them again. It also means making your child eat at the table and watching him as he eats. Richard Burgos is careful to take such precautions these days.

RICHARD BURGOS
I mean, to this day, we still cut his chicken and the meat and everything, we still cut it small. You know any toys with beads on it, or stuffed animals with the eyes that might come off or something like that, you know, you've always got to be concerned about that.

HOST
Not every child is as lucky as Mathew Burgos. Each year, some 3000 people choke to death in this country - often because the people around them didn't know how to react. One potentially fatal mistake a parent can make is to use a finger to try to remove whatever the child is choking on.

D. MULLIGAN-SMITH, MD, FAAP
Never blindly sweep your finger in the back of their throat hoping to pull out the objec





Did you know that seventy-five percent of adults who had ADHD as a child still have it? However, as adults they have found ways to adjusted to their disease so it doesn't cause as many problems for them.